ART490 - Folk, Ethnic, and Indigenous Art (Diversity)

General

Prefix

ART

Course Number

490

Course ID

00140577

Course Level

Undergraduate

Instruction Mode

Studio Lab

Department(s)

Description

Studio course in folk, ethnic, and indigenous art from historical and contemporary perspectives.

Cross Listed Courses

Prerequisites

No Requisites

Credits

Min

3

Max

3

Repeatable

No

Goals and Diversity

MN Goal Course

Yes

MN Goal Designation(s)

06, 08

Cultural Diversity

No

Learning Outcomes

Outcome

Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works of folk, ethnic, and indigenous art by discussing and writing about definitions and images of art from around the world, researching and presenting information about a variety of art, and creating art in a variety of traditions.

Outcome

Describe and appreciate works of art as expressions of individual and collective values within an intellectual, cultural, and historical and social context by examining art in pertinent venues such as MIA, by examining and discussing the work of American Indian artists, and by researching and presenting information about a particular tradition.

Outcome

Interpret and respond critically to works of art by analyzing folk, ethnic, or indigenous art independently and in relation to current critical practices in art history and theory.

Outcome

Engage in creative processes through a series of studio projects based on: 1) self-identity in relation to a particular tradition; 2) researching a particular tradition and making a piece of work in that tradition, and 3) making objects with traditional craft material such as hand-made paper, fiber, fused glass, or wood.

Outcome

Articulate informed personal responses by discussing and writing about definitions and images of art, by creating a studio project on self-identity based on an interpretive and analytical response to folk, ethnic or indigenous art, and by researching a particular folk, ethnic, or indigenous art and making a piece of art in that tradition.

Outcome

Discuss, write, make projects, or take tests to explain how they are connected and related to people elsewhere in the world by examining, comparing, and contrasting examples of global art works of the past and present that depict or address a human experience that we all may share.

Outcome

Describe similarities and differences among global places and populations, students will discuss, write about, make projects, or be tested on the similarities and differences between works of global art and architecture and how each work is a specific manifestation the culture that gives it form.

Outcome

Analyze how works of art and architecture have had or can have a global impact beyond their intrinsic value as aesthetic objects by discussing, writing about, making projects, or being tested on how art intersects with political, economic, or cultural elements on a global scale.

Outcome

Address specific international issues, students will discuss, write about, make projects, or be tested on art and artists who address in their work global issues such as environment; health; migration; food and water security; war; social, ethnic, or religious strife; persecution, totalitarianism, discrimination, white supremacy, and ongoing effects of colonialism.

Course Outline

Course Outline

Definitions and images of art from around the world. 40% Works of art as expressions of individual and collective values within an intellectual, cultural, and historical and social context. 20% Self-identity in relation to a particular art tradition. 20% The interaction of art with global issues such as environment; health; migration; food and water security; war; social, ethnic, or religious strife; persecution, totalitarianism, discrimination, white supremacy, and ongoing effects of colonialism. 20%

Dependencies

No dependencies