PSY228 - Conservation Psychology

General

Prefix

PSY

Course Number

228

Course ID

00140592

Course Level

Undergraduate

Instruction Mode

Lecture

Department(s)

Description

Psychological aspects of conservation and sustainability in the context of environmental, ecological, evolutionary and cross-cultural perspectives including attitudes, values, risk perception, environmental identity, human-nature interactions, behavioral interventions.

Cross Listed Courses

Prerequisites

No Requisites

Credits

Min

3

Max

3

Repeatable

No

Goals and Diversity

MN Goal Course

Yes

MN Goal Designation(s)

05, 10

Cultural Diversity

No

Learning Outcomes

Outcome

Apply the concepts of sustainability and sustainable development, as linked to individual lifestyle choices (housing, transportation, etc.) and day-to-day behaviors (e.g., energy, water use).

Outcome

Connect the urban ecosystem (plants, animals, and ecosystem services, etc.) and the place of humans within the system.

Outcome

Analyze the psychological benefits of human contact with animals and plants and explain the marked preference that humans have for environments containing natural elements, and savanna-like settings as an evolved adaptation (i.e. biophilia).

Outcome

Describe the categories, patterns and challenges of human contact with the natural world: domestic nature (e.g., pets, gardens), managed nature (e.g., zoos, parks,urban green spaces, community gardens, healing gardens), and wilderness areas.

Outcome

Apply basic psychological theories and concepts related to risk perceptions, environmental values, attitudes, and attitude and behavior change (e.g. bounded rationality, values-belief-norm model, elaboration likelihood model).

Outcome

Describe the connections between environmental identity, pro-environmental attitudes and environmentally sustainable behavior using a psychological perspective.

Outcome

Create a behavioral intervention (e.g., design of physical affordances for conservation behaviors, persuasive messages and advertisements, simulations, informational feedback) for the promotion of sustainable behaviors.

Outcome

Demonstrate critical thinking, from a psychological disciplinary viewpoint (e.g. the psychology of cooperation and conflict) about issues of sustainability and conservation on both a local and international scale (case histories of sustainable and unsustainable practices).

Course Outline

Course Outline

-

Dependencies

No dependencies