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Introduction to Rhetorical Theory

General

Prefix

CMST

Course Number

319

Course Level

Undergraduate

Department/Unit(s)

College/School

College of Liberal Arts

Description

Theory and literature of rhetoric from classical to modern times. Nature and scope of rhetoric applies to issues and problems in human affairs.

Credits

Min

3

Max

3

Repeatable

No

Goals and Diversity

Learning Outcomes

Outcome

Describe the historical development of rhetorical theories.

Outcome

Describe the philosophical assumptions and practical applications of rhetorical theories.

Outcome

Describe how rhetorical theories have been shaped by various forces in culture, such as philosophy, art, politics, economics, etc.

Outcome

Critique common misconceptions of rhetoric.

Outcome

Describe and critique how rhetoric functions within people's personal, professional and civic lives.

Course Outline

Course Outline

Classical rhetorical theory: Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian. 20% Middle ages & renaissance rhetorical theory: St. Augustine, Peter Ramus, Francis Bacon, Rene Descartes. 10% Enlightenment – 19th Century rhetorical theory: John Locke, Edmund Burke, George Campbell, Hugh Blair, Richard Whitely. 10% Contemporary (20th Century) Rhetorical theory: I.A. Richards, Kenneth Burke, Wayne Booth, Richard Weaver, Stephen Toulmin, Chaim Perelman & Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca. 20% Rhetorical theory & human experience: connections between rhetoric & concerns related to topics: politics, science, philosophy, arts, culture, education & technology. 20% Rhetorical theory & communication studies: connections between rhetoric & communication contexts & interest areas: interpersonal, group, organizations, intercultural, etc. 20%

Dependencies

Courses

CMST319 is a prerequisite for:

Programs

CMST319 is a completion requirement for: